To vaccinate or not to vaccinate

To vaccinate or not to vaccinate

YES, you need to have your pet vaccinated.

The vaccination will provide protection to your against the various diseases used in the vaccine.

This protection making process takes about 2-3 weeks to be effective and your pet must be healthly at the time of vaccination (That is why a vet will perform a clinical exam on your pet during the consultation). A sick pet (for whatever reason) cannot respond to the vaccine particles as it s hould and the protection response may not occur. This is also why puppies & kittens are vaccinated 3-4 times when they are youngsters and adult animals have their booster vaccinations every 1-3 years.

There has been much debate regarding yearly/annual (every 12 months) vs. every 3 year vaccination protocols: I have decided to take a middle of the road approach, until more scientific evidence is available as to which road to choose. I will continue with the full puppy and kitten vaccination schedule as per the tables in this article and then vaccinate yearly until the pet is 10 years old, after that we can move to a three year vaccination programme with minimal risk. Of course, each animal is evaluated individually and please feel free to discuss any concerns you might have with me.

REMEMBER: When boarding pets in a kennel environment or moving pets over an international border yearly/annual vaccination is the standard requirement by most kennels and importing countries.

Dogs/Canines/Mutts

Vaccine Intervals

▪ We start puppy vaccines at 6w and vaccinate at 4w/monthly intervals until the puppy has had at least 3 “puppy shots” and 2 Rabies shots.

▪ The core 5 in 1 vaccine provides protection against: Canine Distemper Virus(Distemper); Canine Hepatitis (Hepatitis); Canine Adenovirus type2 (Kennel cough); Canine Parainfluenza (Kennel cough); and Canine Parvovirus (Parvo, catflu/katgrip).

▪ We can only start rabies vacc once the puppy is 12 weeks/3months old. (It’s not dangerous to give the vaccination earlier, but it cannot be officially recognised for kennelling or international travel.)

▪ So a normal puppy vaccination schedule looks like this: Age Core Vaccine Extra Vaccine 6w 5in1 or PARVO only Corona 10w 5in1 Corona, Lepto 14w 5in1 & Rabies Corona, Lepto, Kennel cough 16w 5in1 & Rabies Corona, Lepto, Kennel cough

▪ The puppy will then be due for an annual/yearly booster vaccination i.e. Rabies and 5 in 1 vaccines at least, with the extra vaccinations as the environment and circumstances dictate.

Vaccine Types

Core Vaccs

The two core vaccines for dogs are the “5 in 1“ (Canine Distemper Virus(Distemper); Canine Hepatitis (Hepatitis); Canine Adenovirus type2 (Kennel cough); Canine Parainfluenza (Kennel cough); and Canine Parvovirus (Parvo, catflu/katgrip) and Rabies.

Other Vaccs Other possible diseases vaccinated for are: Kennel Cough (Bordetella bronchiseptica); Leptospirosis and Corona Virus.

Every vaccine company has its own core vaccine and then any number of combos of what they feel works best.

A note on “Kennel cough”

Kennel cough is a syndrome name for a group of respiratory/lung diseases that cause runny nose, runny eyes and/or a cough in dogs. The germs in the syndrome include: a bacteria: Bordetella bronchiseptica and 2 viruses: Canine Adenovirus type 2 and Canine Parainfluenza. As you can see the two viruses are included in the normal core vaccination (annual booster vaccs). This is not just a problem found in kennels though – dog shows, training or dog friendly parks are all sources of the disease, so if your pet mingles in any way, VACCINATE.

Cats/Felines/Moggies Vaccine intervals

▪ We start kitten vaccines at 8w and vaccinate at 4w/monthly interval until the kitten has had at least 2 “kitten shots” and 2 Rabies shots.

▪ The core 3 in 1 vaccine contains Calici virus(Snuffles), Rhinotracheitis(Snuffles) and Panleukopaenia Virus (Feline enteritis). ▪ We can only start rabies vaccs once the kitten is 12 weeks/3months old. (It’s not dangerous to give the vaccination earlier, but it is not recognised as officially given).

▪ So a normal kitten vaccination schedule looks like this: Age Core Vaccine Extra Vaccine 8w 3in1 12w 3in1 & Rabies Chlamydia, FeLV, FIV, BB 16w Rabies Chlamydia, FeLV, FIV, BB ▪ The kitten will then be due for an annual booster vaccination.

▪ The FeLV has to be strictly every 12 months as the immunity falls rapidly after that. Deciding to vaccinate for this disease is depended on the disease status in your home, whether your cat is a roamer VS an indoor cat and whether or not you have a multi-cat household or not. It is best to discuss this with your vet before you start the vacc program.

▪ The FIV vaccine interferes with the FIV blood test for the disease, and should only be done after discussion with a vet. Vaccine types

Core Vaccs

The two core vaccines for cats are the “3 in 1“ and Rabies

Other Vaccs

Other possible diseases vaccinated for are Chlamydia (Snuffles); Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV); Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV or Cat AIDS); BB – Bordetella Bronchiseptica(Snuffles).

A Note on “Snuffles/Flu”

Snuffles/Flu is a syndrome name for a group of respiratory/lung diseases that cause runny nose and runny eyes, with a poor appetite. The germs in the syndrome include 2 bacteria: Chlamydia and Bordetella bronchiseptica and 2 viruses: Calici virus and Rhinotracheitis virus. As you can see the two viruses are included in the normal core vaccination (annual booster vaccs). This is not just a problem found in kennels though – cat shows, or visiting pets or strays are all sources of the disease, so if your pet mingles in any way, VACCINATE

REFERENCES: IDR 2009/2010 (MIMS) pp 15-21;33-39;346-355;411-414;434-437;587;592- 595;609;636-638;646-648 © VET ON WHEELS 2011


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